Told You So, Part II

The Telegraph: Going to the dentist every six months is unnecessary, says UK’s top dentist

Ha! So it is and I was very pleased that somebody more influential than I was able to get the topic in the broadsheet paper. In case you haven’t read my blog post about the same subject, please click here.


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Told You So

Told You So, Part III

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Repost with Forewords: Alcohol – The Feared Subject

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Acute pancreatitis is life threatening illness

Today I went to see a man who for my children is very dear despite his dependency to alcohol. They never defined him as an addict and never thought anything but the best of him. This man is their grandfather who fell gravely ill several months ago with acute pancreatitis caused by lifelong abuse of alcohol.

Having spent over five months in hospital of which he spent four in an intensive care (2 months in coma), he was finally at home. But he was a shadow of a man he used to be.

This man used to be proud. He was a kind and pleasant (when sober) man. He was very skilled and was ready to help others when needed. He loved kids and knew what would make them happy.

Today when I went to see him he was lying in bed barely recognisable weighing just 50 kg. He had tubes coming out of his stomach leading into a bag that was filling up with brownish secretion from his organs that were riddled with a spreading necrosis. He was unable to obtain any food or drink inside, taking several medications many times a day, dependent of his wife who was looking after him. His voice was like he was speaking from the grave.

It was the saddest sight I have ever seen. There was no need or desire to say I told you so. No gloating over being right all these years about his future. It was just simple sadness over a kind man, father, husband, grandfather who would have had so much more to give to so many but instead now was bed-bound waiting the imminent death. Slow death that took away all pride and dignity and which every day reminded him why he is where he is now. Alcohol.

But even more sad than seeing him now is the fact that he never got the help he would have needed for his drinking which started at his twenties. No-one intervened when there was still a chance to turn the tables. Instead of this a troubled sensitive soul was taken over by the numbing comfort of an alcohol that took a firmer hold of him as the years went by. He faced many misfortunes in his life and he dealt with them by alcohol. He had happy times and he dealt with them by alcohol. Before he reached his fifties everything he did, everywhere he went the alcohol came along.

He was told by all the close relatives that he cannot continue drinking like this. He was told he has a problem with the alcohol. One day he admitted he does, the other he declined. He never seeked help. And no-one could force him. Instead he came a master in finding excuses to visit his hidden bottle. Taking the garbage out, checking something from the garage, fetching firewood for the fireplace. Everyone who was witnessing this knew that he went for his hidden bottle. This too was heartbreaking to watch.

When he finally fell ill and the house needed to be emptied of all the alcohol there was altogether 30 litres of strong spirit.

This man’s story is not unique. There are plenty of similar fates in the world.

The longer the alcoholic carries on drinking the harder it is to intervene. I mean that the intervention we can do at the dental practice has less impact than it would have in the early days of an addiction. That is why the early intervention is very important and us dental professionals have a very easy and natural way to intervene.

Please read my post below and hopefully it will bring you courage to ask about patients’ alcohol consumption.


About 60 year-old man came to see me one morning and complained that every once in a while a layer of skin comes off inside his mouth and no-one has been able to tell why. He was concerned and felt…

Source: Alcohol – The feared subject

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Not Truly Gone

Ever Seen a Patient with an Implant? Read This!

Dental Revelations Blog-4621

Today I saw a patient who had had an implant done to replace upper right first molar. The implant treatment was finished a year ago in another practice.

Since then the patient had seen hygienist twice in my practice. The implant crown itself looked immaculate but the gum was very red and puffy and it bled heavily after probing.

I knew what to ask next and I even knew the patient’s reply to this.

“Were you told how to clean the implant at home?”

“No I wasn’t” replied the patient with is-it-supposed-to-be-cleaned-expression on his face.

This happens too often. Almost every time I see a patient who has recently had an implant done.

Note for all the dental professionals who make the implant treatment’s final stages and do not give oral hygiene instructions (OHI) for the patient:

You should always tell and show how the patient can clean these costly pieces of metal and porcelain. It is your responsibility as a dental professional and the paying patient’s right!

Can you give me any other excuse for not giving OHI than the fact that you are too busy making money and forgetting the basics? I believe you cannot.

And you hygienists who see patients with implants:

  1. Always check how the patient is cleaning them. More so if the gum around the implant is either bleeding or there is plaque around it
  2. Advice if necessary and show in their mouth how it is done
  3. Check if the patient understood your instructions by asking them to show they can do it. Teach them if they struggle
  4. Check on a follow-up visit that the gum has healed. If not, refer to a dentist

Why Is It So Important?

With the implants it is vital that there is no bleeding in the surrounding gum. They will get an implant’s equivalent to gingivitis – peri-implant mucositis which can lead to the peri-implantitis (same as periodontitis with teeth) very rapidly. The worst case scenario is that the implant will lose its integration to the bone which could have been easily prevented.

The patient I saw today left home with instructions on how to look after his implant. And I will see him for a follow-up visit to make sure the gum has healed (can you see the shining halo around my head?).

Honestly, it’s not that hard to do your job properly so shape up please!


Here‘s further reading on the subject.