I Will Take a Break from Blogging

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With great sadness I am announcing that I will take a break from blogging for unforeseeable time.

I have told you that I was about to publish a book. Well I have now. It’s a novel and I never thought it would take so much time to publish it. It is a self-published novel and it seems like it is becoming relatively popular (well more popular that I could ever have dreamed of). This means that on top of all the marketing I will be doing packing, posting, accounting and writing all the correspondence by myself. Huge job! Especially when I have my day job as well. And small kids.

But it is a rewarding job to do. To share something you have put your heart and soul into.

Once all this book business has settled, I will return. I promise.

Meanwhile, anyone who wants to write as guest author on my blog (patient or dental professional) please send articles to me. Please read through the guest post disclaimer before sending:

Disclaimer – Dental Revelations Guest Post Standards

Dental Revelations aims to maintain certain standard for the content posted on our blog – it is of benefit to everyone. Therefore Dental Revelations:

1. Will proofread posts and amend them if needed.

2. Will not accept posts of low quality in content or grammar (certain errors will be corrected).

3. Will evaluate the content and writing style which should have the similar approach to dentistry as Dental Revelations Blog has.

4. Will not accept posts with links to spammy websites.

5. Will not accept posts with links to irrelevant sites (e.g. site selling car parts). The links need to provide additional value to the reader.

6. Will check the originality of the post (Copyscape) to avoid overload of the same approach to the same topic in the blogging world (e.g. one can write about implant surgery with unexpected, humorous way instead of just plain old why patient benefits of having an implant).

7. Will own the rights to the content on the moment the post is sent to us providing it is published. If not published, the rights to the content are with the author.

8. Will expect the posts to have at least 1000 words.

Further requirements:

1. The guest post should include an author bio. Author bio can have maximum of 2 links to the following sites: to the author’s blog/website/Twitter handle.

2. Guest author should reply to any comments made in their post as soon as possible.

3. Any image attached to the article needs to be royalty-free image.

3. Be creative. Write about dentistry in a way no-one has written before. Forget being polite and politically correct if something is bugging you. Pour your heart out and type away. People will love the genuineness and honesty.

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Vanity with Style? Should You Get Tooth Jewellery?

Can you spot the diamond on my canine?

Human beings have been interested in their appearance for thousands of years. Decorating their bodies with tattoos, piercing ears and other parts of body but also decorating their teeth. Already 2500 years ago were the Native Americans making their teeth stand out with gems. This is a phenomenon that has lasted ever since.

Tooth Jewels – Any Harm?

Well in the mid-nineties I had my first tooth jewel. I was a dental student when the tiny golden figures for the teeth came in fashion. Heart, star, droplet were the figures to choose from. I chose a heart and it was attached to my upper right incisor with a bonding adhesive they use to bond the filling.

For a very long time I was happy with it but then I saw other people who had similar jewellery on their teeth. I thought it looked like people had something stuck on their teeth that needed to be scraped off with a finger nail. It didn’t look like you had golden figure on your tooth and the shape was only visibly in very close distance. I did not want people to think I had food stuck on my teeth – after all I was working as a dental professional already.

But then! I saw somebody having a diamond on his tooth and I was sold there and then. It wasn’t a diamond inserted on a golden figure or a diamond glued on the surface of the tooth. It was a diamond that was planted inside the tooth – to the level of the surface of the enamel.

So I went to a jewellery shop and asked for a small diamond. I asked my colleague to attach it to my canine tooth. He used a diamond bur which had the tip shaped like a cone – similar to the shape of the bottom of the diamond. The dentist drilled a small hole on the enamel with the tip of the bur. The hole was just slightly larger than the diamond’s size. Then he prepared the hole the same way as he would do when making a filling – back then it was first the blue etching gel, then the primer and then the bonding adhesive (nowadays the primer is normally self-etching). Then he took a small piece of a blu-tack and took hold of it with the forceps. He attached the top of the diamond to the blu-tack. Like this 

I know what you are thinking.

Blu-tack!? What the… it’s not something we use in dentistry…

Let me tell you that this dentist was very inventive and clever. He had found a way to keep hold of the difficult shape of the diamond. The last thing you would need is to see the patient’s precious piece of rock flying past your eyes and on to the floor where you, the nurse and probably the patient would be spending the rest of the appointment bottoms up.

Anyway, the dentist placed a small amount of composite filling to the bottom of the cavity he had just made and inserted the diamond to it’s place. Then he light cured it (for non-professionals this means the special light will harden the filling material).

So Is There? Harm I Mean?

It was in 1997 when the diamond was attached to my tooth and yes, it is still there! Some people notice it, some don’t. Often I forget it is there until someone mentions it. I have never regretted I let the dentist drill my intact tooth to insert a diamond.

So to the question on the title – is there any harm in having jewels attached to your teeth.

The ones that are attached to the surface of the tooth

  • are not harmful in any other way than if you’ve chosen a jewel that looks like you have lettuce from your lunch stuck on your teeth. The reason why people are staring at your teeth is not because of your sparkling smile. They are simply going through a silent debate whether or not to tell that you have something stuck on your teeth. Normally they decide not to (this is something I would like people to have more courage at. You should always tell if someone has food stuck on their teeth – we all know how it feels like when you come home after work and look in the mirror and see the parsley between the front teeth…)
  • can be removed without any sign on the tooth you ever had one

The ones that have required tooth material to be filed or drilled away

  • will require a filling or similar to replace the jewellery if you decide to remove it. And it means the tooth is never the same as when it was intact
  • are best to be attached to the teeth that already have filling/s. Do not follow my example!

But there are also removable tooth jewellery as well. Read further to find out.

You Sure You Want to Look Like a Rapper?

If you plan to have large tooth jewel that requires extensive preparations on teeth, remember that

  • you might look like a rapper/jail bird – do you have a habitus to go hand in hand with your new looks of the teeth?
  • some employers dislike visible jewellery and it can be the one single reason not to choose you for the job
  • some of the extensive jewellery like grills look like you have an orthodontic appliance attached to your teeth, which I’m sure is not the intention

About grills. They can pose a risk to your occlusion and cause decay, abrasion (type of tooth wear, see my post about them) and gum problems. It is advisable to wear removable grill only when absolutely necessary. Do not try to glue it to your teeth if it is meant to be removable.

Here’s further reading on the subject (honestly, what was Madonna thinking?).

  • extensive preparations mean that you will need extensive restorations if you decide to remove the jewellery from your teeth

Conclusion

The most important thing is to consult your dentist before you do any extensive alterations on your teeth. It should always be a dental professional who attaches the jewellery on your teeth.

 

 

Vaping: An Attractive Option or a Destructive Alternative for Oral Health?

Guest post by Jack Simon

Here it is my dear readers – the very first guest post on Dental Revelations Blog. Jack Simon is a skilled writer and I am happy that he has offered to write on my blog. Today’s subject is an important one.

Many people are turning to e-cigarettes as the conventional cigarettes are increasingly considered as anti-social. Plus there is this false belief that vaping is safer health wise than conventional cigarettes. Vaping is not safe and there are many health aspects you should consider if you opt for vaping. Jack Simon has comprehensively pointed out those health aspects in this guest post.

Please read it though before the whole vaping business blows up in your face. Literally.


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Are e-cigarettes harmful to your health? Image source: http://www.pixabay.com

The flare of e-cigarettes (ECs) in the recent years has put the health professionals’ in a situation to race against time and discover whether its introduction has been for better or for worse.

ECs, also known as ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems) are the battery operated devices with a metal heating element, which vaporizes a solution comprising a range of chemicals.

These days, more and more individuals are taking it up in preference to or in addition to traditional cigarettes. This hot trend in the market has raised some serious questions for government and public health professionals, as the growth of the products has seriously outpaced the regulations.

People consider e-cigarettes to be a healthier option. A common line that they use to give themselves a false gratification is

“I just vape & don’t smoke and it is not injurious to health”

This fake sense of security in e-cigarettes that they pose no harmful impact, as they use water vapor is actually not true. In reality, the notion that these products are no threat is in fact not 100% verified. If you also have the same approach, then it would be a good time to take a closer look at them and consider the effect they may have on our oral health.

Background

Its introduction in the US led to its extensive use by both smokers and non-smokers. Statistics indicate that about 20.1% of adult smokers tried ECs in 2011 and the rate of its use by school children has doubled during 2011-2012 in the US.

Sales of ECs in 2012 were estimated to be $1.7 billion in the US. If not regulated properly, the economics of ECs are expected to have remarkable growth possibility for the tobacco industry and beat the sales of tobacco smoking cigarettes in the coming decade.

Researchers are conducting a range of experiments to look at them closely. One of such findings showed that e-cigarettes consumers are acquiring much higher levels of chemical toxins – this is in clear-cut contrast to the harm decreasing patter in the ads on offer by ECs companies.

These devices have initially escaped scrutiny for safety standards and rules, but the FDA has latterly begun efforts to form regulations that would control the marketing of these products. In view of their warm acceptance and usage, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) held a workshop in 2013 to find-out the future research concerns relating to the effects of ENDS on health, potential use in cessation of smoking, addictiveness and public well-being. Furthermore, rate of queries from patients to medical practitioners relating to the safety and effectiveness of ECs as smoking cessation devices are increasing with increased acceptance.

In recent study by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, it has been clarified that during the process of nicotine vaporization, a variety of chemicals and metal particles are produced by these devices. The chemicals identified in the aerosols of ECs are: propylene glycol, formaldehyde, glycerine, acetaldehyde, toluene, acrolein, nickel, cadmium, nitrosamines, silicon, aluminum, and lead.

While the levels of these identified compounds and metals in ENDS are quite lower than tobacco smoke, some of them have been found to be carcinogenic and genotoxic by many studies. In addition, smoking characteristics and potential for exploitation by consumers of ECs, periodontal and upper aerodigestive tract epithelial cells, nicotine yield and degree of exposure of oral, physical characteristics of vaporized nicotine and other chemical products are tremendously different if compared to conventional cigarettes.

Let’s Unveil Its Effects on Oral Health

Apart from the recognizable health implications, vaping pose severe damage to your oral health (teeth, gums and tongue). Problems like tooth decay, teeth loss, gingivitis, periodontal disease and oral cancer are the most common ill-effects caused by conventional cigarettes and e-cigarettes. The nicotine absorbency is very high in ECs.

The Journal of the Indian Society of Periodontology published a report to disclose that nicotine significantly contributes to the development of gum problems (gingivitis and periodontitis), which can be the leading cause for bad breath and inflammation throughout the body.

The Journal of Cellular Physiology published the result of recent study, showing that a high rate of mouth cell die with the increased exposure to e-cigarette vapor.

Studies have also revealed that the menthol additive in ECs liquids have a destructive effect on the epithelial cells and the fibroblasts within the periodontal ligament. Its longer term use may also increase the risk of oral cancer; however this is still under investigation.

The Role of Nicotine in Destroying Your Oral Health

  • In Gum Recession
    Nicotine is a vasoconstrictor; therefore it has the tendency to contract the muscular wall of the blood vessels and cutting-down the amount of blood that flows through the veins. With restricted blood flow, the gums do not get sufficient oxygen and nutrients that is necessary for them to stay healthy. Moreover, it chokes mouth tissues, thus cause death of the gum tissues.

  • In Causing Bad Breath
    Nicotine constrains the body’s ability to produce saliva. Lack of saliva can leave your mouth prone to bacteria buildup, tooth decay and dry mouth. This also affects the mouth’s normal inhibitory function of cleaning and reduces the body’s innate capacity to heal and generate new cells.

  • In Intensifying Grinding
    Nicotine acts as a stimulant that fires-up the muscles, making you grind your teeth more intensely or might prompt you to start grinding even if you aren’t a grinder.

  • In Hiding Tell-Tale Signs of Gum Problem
    Nicotine can mask the initial signs of gum disease and makes it hard for a dentist to diagnose it.

Various researches have clarified that vaping impose many potential ill-effects to our oral health. This should be enough to the most rabid vapers to see the whole picture clearly that it is not safe.

The manufacturers of ECs claim that their product is a healthier therapeutic alternative to conventional smoking, but in the absence of any verified scientific study to back this contention, it would be ideal to avoid it.

Nicotine inhalation puts the person’s dental health at greater risks. Regardless of whether these devices pose less harmful effects than conventional smoking, health specialists concur that they are by no means safe.

Your likelihood of getting gum problem is higher as long as you are using nicotine, so visit your dentist in a frequency of three months to prevent tooth loss, bone loss, gum recession and many oral issues.


Author Biography

Jack Simon is a content strategist at Irresistible Smiles. He has flair of writing engaging articles about oral health care. His keen interest in presenting the dental care issues in a simple and straightforward manner is appealing to the readers.

Bits and Bobs

dental-revelations-blog

Birthday Coming Up

Dental Revelations is approaching its 1 year mark in the blogging world. What a journey it has been! I never thought that blogging would bring so much work on top of your day job. But it’s been fun to say the least.

There are exciting times ahead as I have opened my blog for guest posting. So keep an eye on this space especially if you need a change from me preaching and being all righteous all the time…

About the Competition

The competition I released in December didn’t go quite as planned. My aim was to get more audience to my posts via Dental Revelations Blog’s Facebook page. People were supposed to like my Facebook page to enter the competition, but it did not happen (imagine sad face). This marketing stuff for the blog is tough!

There are so many posts with important and always current subjects, which I would like people to read. To mention couple of them:

Alcohol – the Feared Subject

Should You Use a Mouthwash

Cold Sore Is Herpes – Cancel Your Dental Appointment Because Your Dentist Won’t!

Have You Dropped Your Dentures in the Toilet (he-he, not so important post but I had to link something less serious as well)

So I am stuck with brand new Jordan Clean Fresh toothbrush (which is supposed to be very good one and the battery life is phenomenal). Don’t really feel like using it myself as I have my Philips Sonicare and the brand new Oral-b Genius 9000. I think they are enough for me for now…

Guess I’ll run another competition on Facebook.

Criticism Welcomed

From the very start of this blog I have said in the About page that

Nothing comes for free and I bet I will get hate mail… bring it on! The more we discuss, the more change will happen.

I have been waiting for critical commenting and it took a long time for the first one to come. It came to the post Can You Trust the Recommendations given to You by a Dental Professional. This post if any of my posts was the one I knew would attract criticism.

The criticism was given by an anonymous reader and I did have an option to not publish it but I decided to play by the rules I set in the beginning. We need to discuss for dentistry to change. What better way to discuss than debating?

I have noticed that negative commenting is rare in the world of blogging. The advisory posts for beginner bloggers are full of advices to give nice comments to other blogs (to receive the same back). What if you don’t find anything nice to say about somebody’s blog post? What if you think their content is full of factual errors or personal prejudices? Are you allowed to say it in the comment box? And even if you are, will it be published?

I can only speak for my own blog that I will carry on encouraging to comment my post even if it is criticism.

Time for Another Revelation about Me?

Well I think you have deserved it if you have read this far.

I am living the busiest time in my life currently. I am busy at work and I continue being busy at home. My husband travels a lot for work which slightly complicates things at home. But that’s how the work life is nowadays with many professions. It is global. Like this blog is.

But what makes me super busy now is that my book (if you have followed my blog since the beginning, you know I have written a book) is about to be published! It is in a stage of finalising the covers. It is all exiting and scary at the same time. What if it doesn’t sell? What if people hate it? Well, there is always a chance for that. But that chance I must take so that years of hard work won’t go down in the drain. Plus it is something I never dreamt I would achieve.

So I am smiling here my dear readers. Despite being schizophrenically busy all the time.

Ok, that’s all for now. Let me wish you once more Happy New Year! I hope it will bring happiness and prosperity to all of us.

Is Xylitol Good for You?

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Xylitol will help you to improve oral health

What Is Xylitol?

Well I was going to write about xylitol but when collecting facts I run into an article that comprehensively and distinctly gives you the relevant information on xylitol. Why produce something somebody else has done so well? So ladies and gentlemen please read through this article:

Xylitol: Everything You Need to Know (Literally) by Kris Gunnars, BSc at www.authoritynutrition.com

What I will add from an experience to this great article is that always choose a product that is sweetened by xylitol only. This will minimise the possibility of having stomach problems. It is not necessarily the xylitol that is culprit for the enhanced bowel movements but the other sweeteners like maltitol syrup. Trust me, I know from my personal experience. All I need to have is 3 or more pastilles sweetened with both xylitol and maltitol syrup and rest of my family will suffer from consequences – if you know what I mean…

dental-revelations-blog
Use chewing gum or pastilles sweetened 100% with xylitol

Here are couple of sites that sell products (chewing gum, pastilles) sweetened 100% by xylitol:

Peppersmith

Sweetlife – Spry brand

Fazer

Word of Warning

Even though the xylitol is absolutely harmless to us human beings (both children and adults), it can be fatal to dogs. So do not leave any xylitol product in the reach of your dog.

Controversy

Like mouthwashes and sparkling water divide us dental professionals, so does the xylitol. Some don’t know enough about it and some dental professionals take guidance from studies that are low of quality.

In 2015 the Cochrane released a review about xylitol which concluded that the xylitol has not been proven to be effective in prevention of decay. Many of us dental professionals most likely only read the abstract of the review, am I right? Very few of us had enough time or attention span long enough to go through the full version of the review. I mean really go through it – all the 10 studies they had included in their review.

Well I am going to make it easier for you now. I have looked into the full review and have simplified it in the next paragraph.

Cochrane Review and It’s Flaws

There are hundreds of studies about xylitol and caries (decay). In PubMed alone has over 500 of these publications. But yet the Cochrane review has been put together by using only ten of them.

In five of these studies the daily dosage of xylitol was lower than what is known and proofed by several clinical studies to be effective – that is 5 g per day.

Three out of these five studies were studies over toothpastes containing fluoride and xylitol. The levels of xylitol in toothpaste are always lower than the recommended, effective daily dosage of xylitol.

Clinical studies have concluded that the daily dosage and the frequency of use are the key factors in the effectiveness of xylitol. The xylitol should be spread throughout the day into small doses – preferably to 3-4 doses per day. As the xylitol is not antimicrobial compound, it needs to be used this 5 g per day to be effective in reducing the level of bacteria in mouth and therefore caries.

Let me repeat – five of out of ten studies included in the Cochrane review did not use sufficient dosage of xylitol. One out of these five studies wasn’t even a study over xylitol but probiotics – the xylitol was merely used as an adhesive (in milligrams – far from the 5 gram recommended daily dosage).

One out of these five studies did not even state the dosage of xylitol used. So why did they choose them for the review? I will try to find the answer in the Conclusion paragraph.

Ok, enough of those five questionable studies. Lets have a look at some of the remaining studies.

One of them the reviewers themselves think it has a “high overall risk of bias”. Well, they said it themselves – why include it?

Another study was conducted on kids with good oral health – how would you see if the xylitol is effective if there is nothing to improve in oral health? The ones executing this kind of study have been silly in the first place but the Cochrane reviewers are even sillier to include it in the review. What was the point?

Two studies had excellent results in the effectiveness of xylitol (see the other study here). Both of these studies used high enough dosage of xylitol.

Conclusion

It remains to be seen what magnitude of damage on public health one badly executed review has had. There are signs already that it has done great deal of damage. I did just a quick browse through the blogs and the internet and found several articles that were already declaring that the xylitol is useless referring to this Cochrane review. Some even state xylitol is harmful to us.

One must question the motives behind the Cochrane review on xylitol.

Has there been an involvement of the huge sugar industry that feels easily threatened by any alternative (and healthier) option for sugar as a sweetener? It is perhaps one reason why it is difficult to find xylitol products from many countries, especially the further west you go from Europe the more difficult it becomes.

Or was the review put together too hastily and with personal prejudices?

There are several food safety authorities worldwide that have accepted xylitol as food additive. The Joint (WHO/FAO) Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA) allocated xylitol’s ADI (acceptable daily intake) already in 1983 to “not specified” which is the most favourable ADI possible. Also the European Food Safety Authority concluded in 2006:

sugarfree chewing gum sweetened with xylitol is sufficiently characterised in relation to the claimed effects

(See the link for the full article at the bottom of this post)

Why produce a review that undermines the effectiveness of the xylitol when clearly there is no harm using it? Quite contrary, it most likely is beneficial to dental health when used appropriately and can have a positive impact on children suffering from middle ear infections.

The Cochrane reviewers are only emphasising their own self-importance and pettiness by this trivial review which will be in the world wide web forever and ever, with their names on it. It is an achievement I do not envy at all.

The Cochrane Library: Riley P, Moore D, Ahmed F, Sharif MO, Worthington HV. Xylitol-containing products for preventing dental caries in children and adults.

European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on xylitol

Merry Christmas And Happy New Year

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Season’s Greetings. Bokeh photography.

Dear readers,

I wish you a very Merry Christmas and Happy New Year. I will be on a holiday during the Christmas and New Year and I have allowed myself to take a break from blogging for couple of weeks (lets see if I can do it!).

Thank you for this year! Thank you for reading my posts, sharing them and returning back for more – some of you have even taken time to comment them. I am very grateful for all this and hope you will keep on finding posts from my blog that will interest you. The next blog post will be posted after New Year.

Until then, take care and see you soon!

All the best,

Dental Revelations

Enter to Win Jordan Clean Fresh Electric Toothbrush 

Enter a competition for a chance to win Jordan Clean Fresh electric toothbrush.

Dental Revelations is giving away brand new electric toothbrush by Jordan. Plus spare brusheads. If you want to enter the draw, follow the instructions below.

  1. Visit and like facebook page of Dental Revelations Blog
  2. Like the competition post there

That’s it. Simple isn’t it? 

Important note: The Draw will take place only if Dental Revelations Blog’s facebook page has more than 2017 likes by the end of the year 2016. To enter the competition you are not asked to share the competition post – it is up to you to share the news of this great opportunity. The Facebook does not play any role in this competition.

Please note that the toothbrush comes with the European plug-in so you might need an adapter if you live outside Europe. It can be attached to shaver sockets though. Plus you are able to connect the toothbrush to the computer with USB cable for charging.

The draw will be held in the first week of 2017 by scrolling up&down the list of the individuals that have liked (including the ones who have liked the page prior the competition) the Dental Revelations Blog page, then blindfoldedly placing a finger on top of one individual. The winner will be contacted via Facebook messenger (so keep an eye on all the folders in your messenger) for contact details. The winner will be published on the Dental Revelations Blog’s facebook page by full first name and first initial of the surename.

Dental Revelations is not liable for any possible damage that might occur in transit of the toothbrush.

More about the Jordan Clean Fresh here.