I Will Take a Break from Blogging

dental-revelations-blog

With great sadness I am announcing that I will take a break from blogging for unforeseeable time.

I have told you that I was about to publish a book. Well I have now. It’s a novel and I never thought it would take so much time to publish it. It is a self-published novel and it seems like it is becoming relatively popular (well more popular that I could ever have dreamed of). This means that on top of all the marketing I will be doing packing, posting, accounting and writing all the correspondence by myself. Huge job! Especially when I have my day job as well. And small kids.

But it is a rewarding job to do. To share something you have put your heart and soul into.

Once all this book business has settled, I will return. I promise.

Meanwhile, anyone who wants to write as guest author on my blog (patient or dental professional) please send articles to me. Please read through the guest post disclaimer before sending:

Disclaimer – Dental Revelations Guest Post Standards

Dental Revelations aims to maintain certain standard for the content posted on our blog – it is of benefit to everyone. Therefore Dental Revelations:

1. Will proofread posts and amend them if needed.

2. Will not accept posts of low quality in content or grammar (certain errors will be corrected).

3. Will evaluate the content and writing style which should have the similar approach to dentistry as Dental Revelations Blog has.

4. Will not accept posts with links to spammy websites.

5. Will not accept posts with links to irrelevant sites (e.g. site selling car parts). The links need to provide additional value to the reader.

6. Will check the originality of the post (Copyscape) to avoid overload of the same approach to the same topic in the blogging world (e.g. one can write about implant surgery with unexpected, humorous way instead of just plain old why patient benefits of having an implant).

7. Will own the rights to the content on the moment the post is sent to us providing it is published. If not published, the rights to the content are with the author.

8. Will expect the posts to have at least 1000 words.

Further requirements:

1. The guest post should include an author bio. Author bio can have maximum of 2 links to the following sites: to the author’s blog/website/Twitter handle.

2. Guest author should reply to any comments made in their post as soon as possible.

3. Any image attached to the article needs to be royalty-free image.

3. Be creative. Write about dentistry in a way no-one has written before. Forget being polite and politically correct if something is bugging you. Pour your heart out and type away. People will love the genuineness and honesty.

Advertisements

Vanity with Style? Should You Get Tooth Jewellery?

Can you spot the diamond on my canine?

Human beings have been interested in their appearance for thousands of years. Decorating their bodies with tattoos, piercing ears and other parts of body but also decorating their teeth. Already 2500 years ago were the Native Americans making their teeth stand out with gems. This is a phenomenon that has lasted ever since.

Tooth Jewels – Any Harm?

Well in the mid-nineties I had my first tooth jewel. I was a dental student when the tiny golden figures for the teeth came in fashion. Heart, star, droplet were the figures to choose from. I chose a heart and it was attached to my upper right incisor with a bonding adhesive they use to bond the filling.

For a very long time I was happy with it but then I saw other people who had similar jewellery on their teeth. I thought it looked like people had something stuck on their teeth that needed to be scraped off with a finger nail. It didn’t look like you had golden figure on your tooth and the shape was only visibly in very close distance. I did not want people to think I had food stuck on my teeth – after all I was working as a dental professional already.

But then! I saw somebody having a diamond on his tooth and I was sold there and then. It wasn’t a diamond inserted on a golden figure or a diamond glued on the surface of the tooth. It was a diamond that was planted inside the tooth – to the level of the surface of the enamel.

So I went to a jewellery shop and asked for a small diamond. I asked my colleague to attach it to my canine tooth. He used a diamond bur which had the tip shaped like a cone – similar to the shape of the bottom of the diamond. The dentist drilled a small hole on the enamel with the tip of the bur. The hole was just slightly larger than the diamond’s size. Then he prepared the hole the same way as he would do when making a filling – back then it was first the blue etching gel, then the primer and then the bonding adhesive (nowadays the primer is normally self-etching). Then he took a small piece of a blu-tack and took hold of it with the forceps. He attached the top of the diamond to the blu-tack. Like this 

I know what you are thinking.

Blu-tack!? What the… it’s not something we use in dentistry…

Let me tell you that this dentist was very inventive and clever. He had found a way to keep hold of the difficult shape of the diamond. The last thing you would need is to see the patient’s precious piece of rock flying past your eyes and on to the floor where you, the nurse and probably the patient would be spending the rest of the appointment bottoms up.

Anyway, the dentist placed a small amount of composite filling to the bottom of the cavity he had just made and inserted the diamond to it’s place. Then he light cured it (for non-professionals this means the special light will harden the filling material).

So Is There? Harm I Mean?

It was in 1997 when the diamond was attached to my tooth and yes, it is still there! Some people notice it, some don’t. Often I forget it is there until someone mentions it. I have never regretted I let the dentist drill my intact tooth to insert a diamond.

So to the question on the title – is there any harm in having jewels attached to your teeth.

The ones that are attached to the surface of the tooth

  • are not harmful in any other way than if you’ve chosen a jewel that looks like you have lettuce from your lunch stuck on your teeth. The reason why people are staring at your teeth is not because of your sparkling smile. They are simply going through a silent debate whether or not to tell that you have something stuck on your teeth. Normally they decide not to (this is something I would like people to have more courage at. You should always tell if someone has food stuck on their teeth – we all know how it feels like when you come home after work and look in the mirror and see the parsley between the front teeth…)
  • can be removed without any sign on the tooth you ever had one

The ones that have required tooth material to be filed or drilled away

  • will require a filling or similar to replace the jewellery if you decide to remove it. And it means the tooth is never the same as when it was intact
  • are best to be attached to the teeth that already have filling/s. Do not follow my example!

But there are also removable tooth jewellery as well. Read further to find out.

You Sure You Want to Look Like a Rapper?

If you plan to have large tooth jewel that requires extensive preparations on teeth, remember that

  • you might look like a rapper/jail bird – do you have a habitus to go hand in hand with your new looks of the teeth?
  • some employers dislike visible jewellery and it can be the one single reason not to choose you for the job
  • some of the extensive jewellery like grills look like you have an orthodontic appliance attached to your teeth, which I’m sure is not the intention

About grills. They can pose a risk to your occlusion and cause decay, abrasion (type of tooth wear, see my post about them) and gum problems. It is advisable to wear removable grill only when absolutely necessary. Do not try to glue it to your teeth if it is meant to be removable.

Here’s further reading on the subject (honestly, what was Madonna thinking?).

  • extensive preparations mean that you will need extensive restorations if you decide to remove the jewellery from your teeth

Conclusion

The most important thing is to consult your dentist before you do any extensive alterations on your teeth. It should always be a dental professional who attaches the jewellery on your teeth.

 

 

Vaping: An Attractive Option or a Destructive Alternative for Oral Health?

Guest post by Jack Simon

Here it is my dear readers – the very first guest post on Dental Revelations Blog. Jack Simon is a skilled writer and I am happy that he has offered to write on my blog. Today’s subject is an important one.

Many people are turning to e-cigarettes as the conventional cigarettes are increasingly considered as anti-social. Plus there is this false belief that vaping is safer health wise than conventional cigarettes. Vaping is not safe and there are many health aspects you should consider if you opt for vaping. Jack Simon has comprehensively pointed out those health aspects in this guest post.

Please read it though before the whole vaping business blows up in your face. Literally.


e-cigarette-1301670_1920
Are e-cigarettes harmful to your health? Image source: http://www.pixabay.com

The flare of e-cigarettes (ECs) in the recent years has put the health professionals’ in a situation to race against time and discover whether its introduction has been for better or for worse.

ECs, also known as ENDS (Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems) are the battery operated devices with a metal heating element, which vaporizes a solution comprising a range of chemicals.

These days, more and more individuals are taking it up in preference to or in addition to traditional cigarettes. This hot trend in the market has raised some serious questions for government and public health professionals, as the growth of the products has seriously outpaced the regulations.

People consider e-cigarettes to be a healthier option. A common line that they use to give themselves a false gratification is

“I just vape & don’t smoke and it is not injurious to health”

This fake sense of security in e-cigarettes that they pose no harmful impact, as they use water vapor is actually not true. In reality, the notion that these products are no threat is in fact not 100% verified. If you also have the same approach, then it would be a good time to take a closer look at them and consider the effect they may have on our oral health.

Background

Its introduction in the US led to its extensive use by both smokers and non-smokers. Statistics indicate that about 20.1% of adult smokers tried ECs in 2011 and the rate of its use by school children has doubled during 2011-2012 in the US.

Sales of ECs in 2012 were estimated to be $1.7 billion in the US. If not regulated properly, the economics of ECs are expected to have remarkable growth possibility for the tobacco industry and beat the sales of tobacco smoking cigarettes in the coming decade.

Researchers are conducting a range of experiments to look at them closely. One of such findings showed that e-cigarettes consumers are acquiring much higher levels of chemical toxins – this is in clear-cut contrast to the harm decreasing patter in the ads on offer by ECs companies.

These devices have initially escaped scrutiny for safety standards and rules, but the FDA has latterly begun efforts to form regulations that would control the marketing of these products. In view of their warm acceptance and usage, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) held a workshop in 2013 to find-out the future research concerns relating to the effects of ENDS on health, potential use in cessation of smoking, addictiveness and public well-being. Furthermore, rate of queries from patients to medical practitioners relating to the safety and effectiveness of ECs as smoking cessation devices are increasing with increased acceptance.

In recent study by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, it has been clarified that during the process of nicotine vaporization, a variety of chemicals and metal particles are produced by these devices. The chemicals identified in the aerosols of ECs are: propylene glycol, formaldehyde, glycerine, acetaldehyde, toluene, acrolein, nickel, cadmium, nitrosamines, silicon, aluminum, and lead.

While the levels of these identified compounds and metals in ENDS are quite lower than tobacco smoke, some of them have been found to be carcinogenic and genotoxic by many studies. In addition, smoking characteristics and potential for exploitation by consumers of ECs, periodontal and upper aerodigestive tract epithelial cells, nicotine yield and degree of exposure of oral, physical characteristics of vaporized nicotine and other chemical products are tremendously different if compared to conventional cigarettes.

Let’s Unveil Its Effects on Oral Health

Apart from the recognizable health implications, vaping pose severe damage to your oral health (teeth, gums and tongue). Problems like tooth decay, teeth loss, gingivitis, periodontal disease and oral cancer are the most common ill-effects caused by conventional cigarettes and e-cigarettes. The nicotine absorbency is very high in ECs.

The Journal of the Indian Society of Periodontology published a report to disclose that nicotine significantly contributes to the development of gum problems (gingivitis and periodontitis), which can be the leading cause for bad breath and inflammation throughout the body.

The Journal of Cellular Physiology published the result of recent study, showing that a high rate of mouth cell die with the increased exposure to e-cigarette vapor.

Studies have also revealed that the menthol additive in ECs liquids have a destructive effect on the epithelial cells and the fibroblasts within the periodontal ligament. Its longer term use may also increase the risk of oral cancer; however this is still under investigation.

The Role of Nicotine in Destroying Your Oral Health

  • In Gum Recession
    Nicotine is a vasoconstrictor; therefore it has the tendency to contract the muscular wall of the blood vessels and cutting-down the amount of blood that flows through the veins. With restricted blood flow, the gums do not get sufficient oxygen and nutrients that is necessary for them to stay healthy. Moreover, it chokes mouth tissues, thus cause death of the gum tissues.

  • In Causing Bad Breath
    Nicotine constrains the body’s ability to produce saliva. Lack of saliva can leave your mouth prone to bacteria buildup, tooth decay and dry mouth. This also affects the mouth’s normal inhibitory function of cleaning and reduces the body’s innate capacity to heal and generate new cells.

  • In Intensifying Grinding
    Nicotine acts as a stimulant that fires-up the muscles, making you grind your teeth more intensely or might prompt you to start grinding even if you aren’t a grinder.

  • In Hiding Tell-Tale Signs of Gum Problem
    Nicotine can mask the initial signs of gum disease and makes it hard for a dentist to diagnose it.

Various researches have clarified that vaping impose many potential ill-effects to our oral health. This should be enough to the most rabid vapers to see the whole picture clearly that it is not safe.

The manufacturers of ECs claim that their product is a healthier therapeutic alternative to conventional smoking, but in the absence of any verified scientific study to back this contention, it would be ideal to avoid it.

Nicotine inhalation puts the person’s dental health at greater risks. Regardless of whether these devices pose less harmful effects than conventional smoking, health specialists concur that they are by no means safe.

Your likelihood of getting gum problem is higher as long as you are using nicotine, so visit your dentist in a frequency of three months to prevent tooth loss, bone loss, gum recession and many oral issues.


Author Biography

Jack Simon is a content strategist at Irresistible Smiles. He has flair of writing engaging articles about oral health care. His keen interest in presenting the dental care issues in a simple and straightforward manner is appealing to the readers.